Productivity analysis in construction

The construction sector is constantly changing and evolving, especially with the onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Here we will take a deeper look at productivity analysis in construction and provide examples of how these trends will affect future practice within the industry.

Productivity is one of the most widely used indices for measuring production efficiency, often expressed as a ratio between output and input (or effort). Productivity analysis in construction has traditionally focused on labour productivity, a measure of output per labour unit. These efforts improve the overall efficiency within the industry by discovering what changes can lead to an increase in efficiency and profitability.

Construction projects should always estimate the possible costs, materials, and time needed to complete the overall build. However, plenty of factors can cause a rift in the construction process and vastly affect the general productivity analysis report initially set. This sudden influx of risk measurement and cost adjustment will need to undergo a thorough investigation. Thus, construction productivity is one of the deciding factors in determining your company’s success in the construction industry landscape.


Application of Productivity Analysis In The Construction Industry

RPMS - Productivity analysis in construction
Application of Productivity Analysis In The Construction Industry

Productivity means the overall efficiency of a company. In this case, construction management determines the overall time and costs for the entire site. This piece of data can help drastically improve higher productivity for both your workers and the leadership behind the scenes. As such, you can expect that the building operation process would flow out much smoother when having the proper labour productivity analysis in check. 

Building projects would need ample engineering and development before you can start piecing various materials together. This aspect alone can already determine the quality of management that would lead the construction workers. Proper utilization and timing of construction equipment and technology can help limited skilled workers improve their workflow compared to those that handle projects by hand.


Understanding The Impact of Construction Labor Productivity On Projects

RPMS - Productivity analysis in construction
Impact of Construction Labor Productivity On Projects

However, construction labour is an intensive task. Several critical factors would need to come into play before you can develop a final labour productivity assessment. The absence of productivity within a company would make your employees lazy and undependable for good work. This steady downfall in workplace productivity will continue to snowball the entire construction project in all aspects until the total factor productivity growth shatters completely.

Construction managers must take every aspect of understanding labour productivity with the utmost seriousness to prevent any laxity in production and efficiency. You can also find that a direct line forms the income generated by businesses that fail to produce a high labour productivity result. Since this labour productivity analysis is not something you can expect to hide from any of your clients, you can bet that most of these companies will instantly discover better opportunities than your competitors.


Factors Affecting Construction Productivity 

RPMS - Productivity analysis in construction
Factors Affecting Construction Productivity 

While one of the largest economies, the construction sector has not always been a high-performing industry. High labour costs and productivity issues have hindered profitability for many firms over recent decades. As a result of decreased labour availability, wages increasing at rates that outpaced inflation, and increased regulation surrounding safety on job sites, construction productivity has declined significantly.


Labor Productivity vs Labor Output

There are two main types of labour productivity. Labour output is calculated as the number of people a firm employs, while labour productivity is measured by how productive those workers are. In construction specifically, it is essential to measure the size of the workforce and how much they produce. 

Unfortunately, this distinction often gets muddled because labour productivity can negatively correlate with labour output for construction firms. If the number of workers employed decreases and their total work, this calculation would return a negative value. This process is common practice in construction, in which high wages often trickle down to the consumer.

Productivity vs Product Quality

When measuring productivity, it is vital to calculate the final product’s total value and its quality. When labour productivity rates are high in construction, there has been an increase in shoddy construction practices and a decrease in time management. This process can include cutting corners on building materials or techniques to expedite projects and increase profits. While this method is usually to cut costs, it can lead to future issues with the building that lower its resale value or cause safety hazards for the occupants of the building.

The opposite end of this spectrum is when labour productivity rates are low but have high construction quality. This situation can be due to a lack of incentives that encourage quality work over speed.

Other Factors Affecting Productivity

Apart from labour productivity issues, other factors can influence project success, including financial capital, economic conditions, and local demographics. All of these factors combined can help explain why construction productivity rates have declined over the last decades.

The construction industry is one of the largest sectors in the economy and one of the most labour-intensive. Over recent decades, however, labour productivity has declined significantly due to many factors, including wages, increasing at rates that outpace inflation and increased regulation surrounding safety on job sites. 

As a result, labour output has increased more than twice as fast as employment since the 1970s, but this growth has not kept pace with the population. Rather than producing fewer people per capita, construction labour numbers have risen slower than the population.

When measuring productivity in construction, it is essential to measure both the final product’s total value and quality. When labour productivity rates are high in construction, there has been an increase in shoddy construction practices and a decrease in time management. 

This procedure can include cutting corners on building materials or practices to expedite projects and increase profits. While this method usually cuts costs, it can lead to future issues with the building that lowers its resale value or cause safety hazards for the occupants of the building.


Last Words On Productivity In The Construction Industry

Productivity in the construction industry has a lot of variables in play. It is not simply about the number of employees or workers assigned to a given project. Their efficiency in accomplishing tasks depends on the materials and resources available to them. Furthermore, the organization of project leads and stakeholders also plays a role. Without proper planning and project scheduling, the team can’t function at peak efficiency.

Putting everything together, construction leads and stakeholders need to account for all aspects when planning and to implement projects. Doing so allows for an efficient workflow and management mechanism that will keep the project on budget and track for deadlines and closing dates.

RPMS - Productivity analysis in construction
Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap